Sermons & Homilies

On Remembrance of Death - A Sermon for the Sunday of St. John Climacus (2024)
I think most, if not all of us, are familiar with St. John Climacus, and his eloquent, witty, and above all soul-saving teaching found in the Ladder, moderately balanced between stern spiritual sobriety and loving fatherly humor. This is the reason for his significance in the Church for both monks and laity, revealed by a whole Sunday during Great Lent being dedicated to him. Because of the shortness of time allotted to a Sunday sermon, I want to focus on just one aspect of his teaching.
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The Heart of Tradition - A Sermon for the Sunday of St. Gregory Palamas (2024)
The feast of St. Gregory Palamas this Sunday is a second Triumph of Orthodoxy. It was first instituted less than 10 years after St. Gregory reposed in the Lord. This is a remarkable fact. This ought to tell us something. It says, our Fathers recognized something so important and essential in the life and teaching of St. Gregory that they did not hesitate to accord it public veneration and to praise it with sacred hymns, even while he was within living memory.
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On Thankfulness - Homily on the Parable of the Prodigal Son (2024)
Thankfulness lies at the heart of the Church’s life and worship. Eucharist, as is well known, means thanksgiving. Thankfulness is a confession of God’s greatness and goodness born from experience of his love. The importance of thankfulness surrounds us in our ascetical and liturgical spiritual lives. It shows up in the very first page of the Philokalia in St. Anthony the Great, who explains that it is absurd that we often thank physicians who prescribe bitter medicines and perform painful surgeries for our health’s sake, but do not thank God for those things which seem harsh to us but are soul-saving.
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Symeon the God-receiver and Patient Endurance - Homily on the Feast of the Meeting of Our Lord (2024)
Today is the fortieth day since we celebrated the Nativity of Christ, and so today, we celebrate the Meeting of the Lord, a Feast of the Lord having its roots in the book of Exodus wherein the Lord gave the command to Moses: “Consecrate to me every firstborn male. The first offspring of every womb among the Israelites belongs to me, whether human or animal.” (13.1-2, cf. Luke 2.23). We celebrate this event today because Christ is the firstborn male, and the first offspring, and, therefore, was brought into the Temple by his parents, confirming their obedience to the Law.
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